How to make V1507 a little easier.

V1507
V1507

It is no secret I adore my V1507. Thinking about it I adore most of my me mades! It is the first pattern I’ve made using one of the big pattern brands in probably twenty years. This make was completely inspired by Sophie at @adaspragg. Her style and the way she plays with proportion is next level. And she can pull it off. Although I could never mirror that style and dress sense, I love to do my version of makes that inspire me.

V1507
V1507

I attempted to cut this pattern from various fabrics in my stash with each choice coming up short in fabric yield. This pattern takes a whooping 2.2 to 2.8mts of fabric depending on the width of your fabric.  The amount of fabric is due to the layers and large curved pattern pieces.

V1507
V1507

I picked up a cotton dobby in Hong Kong that had just enough fabric to fit all the pattern pieces.

This make was a little bit fiddlely with all the roll hemming required and the pattern had additional seam allowance on the lower edges to sew a fold line, then trim, then fold and sew the hem. Personally I found this process quite time consuming and un necessary if you are used to sewing double turned or rolled hems.

V1507
V1507

Next time I will reduce the pattern pieces on the rolled hem edges by 1.5cm and use a roll hem foot to finish the edges. Segway here, if you don’t own a roll hem foot for your machine do yourself a favor and invest in one. They are amazing once you get the hang of them. It’s my favorite bonus foot.

V1507
V1507

Once all of the roll hemming is out of the way the top did come together quite quickly. Do double check when joining your sleeves that you have the overlap the same way around on both sides.

V1507
V1507

To get the tie looking great on the back, I tie the top before putting it on. It slips on easy with the tie done up and you don’t have to be a contortionist trying to tie the back once it is on.

V1507
V1507

V1507 is a beautiful warmer weather top that can be worn with jeans, shorts or a skirt. The back detail is super cute and covers the bra strap which is a must for me.

V1507
V1507

The Frisco Jumpsuit by Theadbear Garments.

Frisco Jumpsuit

Woop woop! I have officially been a pattern tester for the very first time. I was so honored when Threadbear Garments selected me as one of their pattern testers for the Frisco Jumpsuit.

 

Leslie has designed a jumpsuit that is super easy to wear with its elasticated waistband and super flattering shape for a variety of body types. Trust me on this one. I had the privilege of seeing this jumpsuit on various body types throughout the pattern testing process and it looked fabulous on everyone.

Frisco Jumpsuit

The pattern recommends cutting the size that is closest to your hip measurement given the jumpsuit pulls on and off over your hips. Personally I cut the size 6 C/D which was slightly smaller than my hips but matched my waist & bust. I’m not a fan of excess fabric around my hip area and I like a good fit at the bust and waist. I also think it’s easier to grade the hips out slightly if required than to grade in a bodice.

Frisco Jumpsuit

BUT before taking my advice, changes where made to the fit of this pattern to slim down the pant slightly prior to release. Please remember that my jumpsuit was made from the original pattern.

After making my toile in calico I was really happy with the fit except for the excess blousing of the fabric at the back bodice. For my final jumpsuit I curved the back bodice waist seam up about 1.5cm at centre back maintaining the side seam length as per the pattern. I’m so glad I made this adjustment and now love the fit of the bodice.

Take care when sewing on your straps to get the angle and length correct. There is nothing worse than straps that slip off and gap. When I make the Frisco Jumpsuit for a third time I am going to reduce the strap length ever so slightly.

Frisco Jumpsuit

My final Jumpsuit was made in a linen blend that I picked up for $8 at a local label’s sample and fabric sale a couple of weeks ago. It is a mid weight fabric with a nice handle and drape that works well for this pattern. The only other adjustment I will make next time around is to reduce the length of the tie. It’s a little long for me to wear untucked.

This is definitely a pattern I recommend toiling first before making in your final fabric. It’s impossible to create a pattern that fits all body types, bodice lengths, leg lengths, hips / waist proportion and waist / bust proportion but with a little tweaking here and there you will have the perfect Jumpsuit in no time.

Frisco Jumpsuit

The Persephone Pants

Persephone Pants

I have been doing a lot of reflection around fear lately and in particular the fear of failure. I have missed so many opportunities due to my fear of not being enough, not knowing enough and the fear of failing. It’s taken me a few years and a ton of self reflection but I am slowly changing my relationship with fear. Unless a situation is truly life threatening I am learning to embrace fear and seeing it as a catalyst to change. Fear is my friend. It means I am on the cusp of learning something new, even if it doesn’t go right first time around. Step into fear….. It’s where the magic happens ✨

Persephone Pant

Now for my thoughts on the Persephone Pants. Every time I see a pair of these pants in my Insta feed I go Gaga! And they didn’t disappoint. They have been a little bit of a roller coaster sew and I don’t think I have them quite right yet but they are edging closer to being a great fit.

Persephone Pant

For my toile, I cut a straight size 6 in a 10oz stretch denim from The Fabric Store in a yummy cream colour. I omitted the front pockets, replaced the button fly with a zipper fly front and after reading a few comments I changed the waistband to a curved waistband. I was able to use the waistband and fly front pattern pieces from The Dawn Jean.

Persephone Pant

The Persephone Pants are a high waisted pant, however, I found them to be sky high in the waist. I reduced the rise by 1.5cm through the lengthen and shorten line and then took an additional 0.5cm from the centre back rise at the waist to accommodate my flat seat. I really don’t like when pants buckle a centre back before the waistband and this small adjustment solves that problem for me.

Persephone Pants

I also found the size 6 to be a little big on my toile. This was the adjustment that cause me the most concern. I have read many blog posts on these pants where makers have sized down and then their pant was too tight. Against my better judgment, I made a rookie error and graded down a full size for my final version. And my final version was made in a beautiful black rigid 10oz Cotton Twill from A+R Fabrics.

Persephone Pants

That right there was my rookie error and I absolutely should know better. From a toile with some stretch to a rigid final, what was I thinking! Even as I was cutting the pattern down to the size 4 I was questioning every snip. In hindsight I should have graded down a half size and graded the waist up ever so slightly given the waistband would now be sitting down lower on my waist.

Persephone Pants

Anyway……. after a long Friday night of sewing I finished my second version of the pant at around 11.30pm. I tried them on and they were tight! Particularly in the waist. I would not have been able to eat a single pea without popping them! But I had to rescue them because the rigid 10oz Cotton Drill fabrication was amazing.

Persephone Pants

I decide to sleep on a solution and when I woke I had a plan of action. I unpicked the waistband and tried on the pant without the waistband and hallelujah they fit. I measured the top of the pant while they were on my body to work out the waistband length required so that the pant would fit comfortably.

Persephone Pants

I recut the waistband adding 4cm to its length, let out the back darts and centre back rise a smidge gaining an extra 1.5cm to the waist of the main pant. With these adjustments I now have a Persephone Pant in a 10oz Rigid Cotton Drill that fit beautiful.

My learnings from this project for my next pair are only grade down a half size, keep the rise adjustment and grade the waistband up a half size. If you are reducing the length of the rise so the pant will finish lower on your waist it’s important to increase the length of the waistband as it will sit on a slightly wider part of your waist. It’s going to be third time lucky with this pattern.

Persephone Pants

How to turn the Hilary Top into a dress.

I’ve been AWOL from my blog for over a month but I am back and bursting with ideas and sewing projects to share with you one project at a time. May and June were big travel and work months for me with a work trip to Hong Kong and China followed by a three week vacation in the south of France, Spain and a touch of Portugal. It was amazing and I’m so grateful to have those travel experiences in my life.

The Hilary Top as a dress.

My first sewing project to get back into the swing of things was a hack of the Hilary Top by Tessuti Fabric into a dress. I first made the Hilary Top about six weeks ago before my trip overseas. When I tried it on for the first time my partner said it looks like it should be a dress. From there the idea was born to turn it into a dress to wear to a dear friend’s engagement party.

The Hilary Top as a dress.

It was the perfect jet lag busting project to keep me sane during my first week back in Australia. I purchased a dreamy Liberty of London Bloomsbury crinkle silk chiffon from The Fabric Store Online during their recent 30% off sale and their 100% Rayon Crepe for the lining. The Rayon Crepe was a mid weight fabric and in hindsight and light weight lining would have been a better option.

The Hilary Top as a dress.

Converting the Hilary Top into a dress was a very easy pattern adjustment. I simply extend the frill by 88cm to create the maxi skirt for the dress. I also increased the sleeve length by 8cm and the undersleeve and 4cm at the top sleeve to create a little extra drama with the sleeves. It was that simple.

The Hilary Top as a dress.

Given my fabric choice was a crinkle chiffon I did have to line the main body of the dress. It was a no brainer to keep the sleeves unlined. I cut the front and back bodice lining using the pattern pieces and drafted a skirt lining pattern. I did this by measuring the bodice hem (on the fold) and creating a skirt pattern (on the fold) by drawing a slightly curved waist seam that shaped out to a hip curve with a hem opening that provides enough room for movement.

The Hilary Top as a dress.

The dress was finished using french seams except for the bodice which didn’t require finishes as it was completely lined. Chiffon’s are a little tougher to sew due to fabric movement but I took my time with this project and it all came together beautifully.

The Hilary Top as a dress.

A brief run down on my construction order for those who are interested was as follows:

  1. Construct the sleeves as per the pattern instructions but with french seams.
  2. Sew the front & back bodice pieces together.
  3. Sew front & back lining pieces together leaving a 7cm hole in the middle of 1 side seam that is used to finish off attaching the skirt to the bodice.
  4. Sew the front & back body to the front & back lining at the neck. Understitch the neck seam.
  5. Sew the sleeves to the main body of the bodice.
  6. Bag out the sleeves with the lining.
  7. Sew the front & back skirt side seams together using french seams. Pin and stitch box pleats as per pattern instructions.
  8. Sew front & back lining side seams together using french seams.
  9. Join the skirt lining to the skirt.
  10. Sew the skirt (lining and body) to bodice.
  11. Bag out the waist seam with the bodice lining. Sew as much as you can and then finish this seam by pulling it through the hole left in one of the bodice lining side seams.
  12. Iron the waist seam flat and stitch a 1/2″ casing on the bodice side at the waist seam. Leave a hole to thread the elastic through. Use the hole in the lining to thread your elastic through the casing.
  13. Hand stitch the hole in the lining shut once you have the elastic securely fastened in the casing.
  14. Level the hem and finish with a roll hem on the skirt and skirt lining.

I was really happy with how the dress turned out.

The Hilary Top as a dress.

The Versatility Of The Adelia Dress Pattern.

My real job has been a little crazy at the moment leaving limited time for my hobbie; blogging, pattern making and sewing. I have been meaning to write this post for a few weeks now and finally it is here.

The Adelia Dress pattern by The Hemming makes the best foundation for an easy wear top for those balmy spring and summer days.  The Hemming has a great tutorial on her website on how to convert the dress into a top.

On this occasion I was inspired by a top on Free People and immediately thought of The Adelia Dress pattern as a base. I removed the 1cm seam allowance from the centre back seam and the front button tab seam allowance from the front top.  I added a little extra length to the top this time for modesty.

It is difficult to see with the pattern in the fabric but the sleeves have been converted into a raglan sleeve with a little knife pleat at the shoulder.

My fabric is a 100% cotton panel print purchased from The Fabric Store in Brisbane. The boarder print was placed at the sleeve hem and also used for the front neck facing which was added to the right side of the neckline instead of an inside facing.

I’m really happy with how this top turned out and can’t rave enough about the versatility of The Adelia Dress pattern. I also think it would convert into a super cute playsuit.  Another idea to add to my growing list of sewing projects to conquer.

As always I finished my top off with a label from Kylie And The Machine. Sewing these labels into my home made garments always fills me with a sense of pride.

Ripping A Pattern From My Favourite Top.

I have a top in my wardrobe that I absolutely love. It is about 2 years old and from a little Aussie brand called Nunui.

Nunui Top
Nunui top that I love

Its such a fun transeasonal top that I wear with everything from jeans to shorts & skirts. It’s also a top that has minimal fabric wastage.

My version
My version of my favourite Nunui Top

The front and back body are big rectangles with a shallow neck line. The front neck and back neck drop are only 6cm. This is another reason I love this top so much. The neckline is very closed but it doesn’t feel frumpy to wear.

Side view

The sides under the arm are made up of 2 more smaller rectangles. The sleeves consist of a rectangle with gathers at the shoulder head with another rectangle gathered on to make the sleeve frill.

I finished the sleeve frill with a small rolled hem on both sides using my role hem foot. I love this foot. It is the best foot to get the perfect roll hem finish.  I gathered one edge of the sleeve frill about 1cm down from the roll hem and stitched it to the main sleeve to create a little frill at the join of the main sleeve and sleeve frill.

The back is finished with a button tab. This is functioning, however, is not needed to get in and out of the top.

Back view
Back view

My fabric selection for this piece is a beautiful 100% cotton double gauze from Blackbird Fabrics.  The khaki colour I purchased must be sold out….. The Fabric was very easy to use. It is quite stable and easy to sew. I will definitely be using more of this fabric in other projects.

Feel free to leave a comment if you would like more details of this pattern.

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The End

The Bermuda Short

The Bermuda Short

Have you ever wanted a short that is not to short? I have been looking at the Bermuda Short for a while and how to translate that into a style that is functional and fun.

My inspiration and pattern.

I stumbled across a short on the Free People website a little while ago that has been sitting in my favorites waiting for the perfect fabric and until I had the motivation to pattern make a Short from my blocks. Last weekend Spotlight Stores had 2 for $12 Vogue patterns which is an absolute bargain. Flicking through the pages of the Vogue Pattern book found v9319 and instantly knew that it would be the perfect base to my long awaited Bermuda Short.

I cut the size 14 pattern which matched my body measurements (I am an AU size 10), but in hindsight I will cut a size 12 moving forward. I added a panel line to the main front short and created a side front pocket panel piece to create the pocket.

Pockets and panels
Pockets and panels

I used the fly, fly guard and waistband pattern pieces from the Dawn Jean, adapting the waistband to create an overlap at center front. I added a 10 cm overlap to my short on the wearers right side. My tip is to think about all the patterns you have and the previous styles you have made. Really think about how you can combine pattern pieces to create the overall look you are going for.

Combining pattern pieces from various patterns.
Combining pattern pieces from various patterns.

v9313 was marked as an easy pattern to sew. The fly front on my hack made it a slightly more complex sew, but once you nail the fly front you won’t look back. Practice makes perfect. You’ve got this….. Utilize the instructions you have in your pattern stash if you are not confident with a fly front.

My fabric is Viscose Linen Noil from Blackbird Fabrics. This fabric is so dreamy, soft and drapey. I waited a little while for this fabric to travel from Canada to Australia but so worth the wait.

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The End

Happy sewing peeps!

How to draft a wrap skirt with a frill

I don’t know about anybody else but I’m going through a skirt phase at the moment. Maybe it’s because I can feel the cooler weather coming and I’m trying to hold onto my summer vibe for as long as possible.

My wrap skirt with a frill
Side view of wrap skirt with a frill

For this post I am going to focus on how to draft a wrap skirt with frill and I will do a second post on how to sew the skirt.

You will need some pattern paper, pencil, rubber, ruler, curve ruler if you own one, tape measure, tracing wheel, paper scissors and a round dinner plate with a diameter of approx 25.5cm.

To start, draft yourself a 1/4 circle skirt pattern following the instructions on my How to make a clashing print 1/4 circle swing skirt blog post. Stop at the point once your 1/4 circle skirt pattern is complete.

Fold your 1/4 circle skirt in half and trace onto a new piece of paper. This will be the front or back of your wrap skirt. Be sure to mark the midline of the skirt when tracing if off. This will be the centre front or centre back of your skirt.

1/4 circle skirt folded in half
1/4 circle skirt folded in half

To create a better shape for a wrap skirt follow the below steps. The blue line is the original side seam of the 1/4 circle skirt.

Front pattern guide
Front pattern guide
  1. Mark a point 16cm down 1 side seam from the waist. Mark a 2nd point 1.5cm out from this point.
  2. Mark a 3rd point 32cm down from the waist seam on the same side.
  3. My 1/4 circle skirt was 60cm long which is a good midi length on me. The length of your 1/4 circle skirt may vary depending on your height. Mark a point 6cm in from the side seam at the hem.
  4. Draw a curved line from the waist through point 2 crossing back over the 1/4 circle side seam at point 3. Then draw a straight line from point 3 to the point at the hem.
  5. Mark a final point 6cm up from the hem on your new side seam line. This will be the new length of the skirt (without the frill).
  6. Mark a point 37cm down from the waist on the midline of the pattern.
  7. Mark a point on the opposite side waist 3cm in from the side seam.
  8. Draw a curved line from the hem, through the point on the mid line finishing at the point 3cm in from the side seam at the waist.
Use your curve ruler to help with drawing lines
Use your curve ruler to help with drawing lines

You now have the outline of your front wrap skirt. I have this outlined in green pen on my image.

Front pattern guide
Front pattern guide

To create the back body pattern, fold the paper in half along the midline and trace your new side seam so it will be the same on the other side of your pattern.

Trace the side seam of the front skirt to the other side of the pattern
Trace the side seam of the front skirt to the other side of the pattern

Fold out the pattern and mark the side seam of the back skirt in red.

Back pattern is marked in red
Back pattern is marked in red

To finish off the back pattern mark a point 8cm up from the 1/4 circle pattern piece. Connect this point with the side seam.

You now have the back pattern piece which is outlined in red on my image.

The outline for your front and back pattern piece is now complete. I recommend keeping this outline complete and trace off your pattern pieces to add seam allowance. This enables you to make any adjustments once you test the fit of your skirt.

First trace your front pattern piece by pinning your outline to a new piece of paper. Trace around the pattern using a tracing wheel. Be sure to trace your midline as this will also be the grain line of the pattern.

Trace the front pattern piece
Pin the front pattern piece to a new piece of paper and trace off

To finish off the front pattern piece add a 1cm seam allowance all the way around the pattern, mark your grain line and label the pattern to cut 1 pair. Notch the centre front and add 2 notches to the front curve. I added a notch 26cm down from the waist seam and 25cm in from the hem.

Finished front pattern piece
Finished front pattern piece

Then trace off your back pattern piece by pinning your outline to a new piece of paper and tracing with the tracing wheel. To finish off the back pattern piece add 1cm seam allowance all the way around and label the pattern to cut 1 on fold.

Trace back pattern piece onto new paper
Trace back pattern piece onto new paper
Finished back pattern piece
Finished back pattern piece

Now it’s time to create your frill pattern pieces. In preparation measure the front hem curve and back hem. My front hem curve is measuring 79cm and the back hem is 33cm.

Measuring front and back hem for frill
Measuring front and back hem for frill

To create the back frill use a round dinner plate that has a circumference of approx 25.5cm. If the plate is slightly bigger or slightly smaller it will be ok.  Place you plate on a new piece of paper and trace around as per the image below.

Trace around your plate
Trace around your plate

Now measure around the circumference the distance of your back hem measurement. Draw a line 20cm out from the beginning and end of your line. 20cm is the length of the frill. You can shorten or lengthen the frill to whatever length you desire.

Back frill pattern layout
Back frill pattern layout

Mark a few points around the curve at 20cm to help guide the hem line of the frill all the way around. Add 1cm seam allowance to the top edge of the frill and one side seam of the frill. Add a 1.2cm hem to the lower edge of the frill which will be a 6mm roll hem to finish the frill edge. Mark the other edge of the back frill with a centre back on fold. Your back frill pattern is now complete.

Back frill pattern
Back frill pattern

Thr front frill pattern is slightly more complicated as you don’t want the circle to be to tight as you get closer to the top edge of your skirt. It will be to fluted around your hip area which is not as flattering on the body.

To start draw a circle around your plate and mark the circle into quarters.

Front frill pattern guide
Front frill pattern guide

At the half way point of the circle mark a point 8cm back along the curve. You will start to straighten the curve at this point. Mark another point 11cm away from the circle 3/4 of the way around the circle. Draw a curve line through these points. This curve will form inner edge of your frill.

Measure around 25cm from the beginning of the circle which is the distance to your first notch on the front skirt hem pattern. Mark a notch at this point. Then measure around the distance of your second notch. Mine was 27cm but yours may vary depending on the size of your skirt.  Finally measure around 26cm to the top of the front frill.

Front frill pattern
Front frill pattern

The width of your frill is going to get narrower as you move to the top of the frill. To create a nice frill width measure out 16cm at the first notch and 11cm at the second notch. Then free hand draw a curve through these points until you see a nice curve frill shape.

Final front frill pattern
Final front frill pattern

Finally add seam allowance to the side seam and top edge of the frill. Then add 1.2cm hem at the bottom edge of the frill. Mark a grain line on the frill that is parallel to the side seam.

Next create your waistband pattern piece. To do this measure the waist of the front and back skirt pattern pieces.

Waistband
Waistband

Break your waistband up into the back waistband marking centre back and the side seam and then mark you centre front, finishing at the front side. My back waist measures 34cm (17cm to CB, 17cm to SS). My front waist is 17.5cm to CF and 13.5cm to front side. My total waistband was 65.5cm long. This is 5cm shorter than my true waist measurement which is fine given the crossover and tie side. The waistband width is 3.5cm finished which will be 7cm in total width. Finally add 1cm seam allowance all the way around your waistband.

Pin and trace the front waistband
Pin and trace the front waistband

The left front will be finished with a facing. To create the facing, pin the front pattern piece to a new piece of paper and trace around the top edge and down the sides. The waistband facing width will be 6cm (includes seam allowance at top edge when tracing). Note which side is the side seam and check which side to label to ensure it will be the left front facing.

Final front left facing pattern piece
Final front left facing pattern piece

The final two pattern pieces are the button tab which is a rectangle 7cm x 9cm and the ties which are 52cm x 5.5cm at one end and 4.5cm at the other end.

Button tab and waist ties
Button tab and waist ties

Your self drafted wrap skirt pattern is now complete. Be sure to test your pattern before making in your final fabric and make any adjustments as required.

Keep an eye out for the blog post on how to sew your skirt in the coming weeks.

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The End

Please feel free to leave feedback on my tutorials. This will help me improve my delivery. Pattern making can be quite complex and my aim is to be a clear as possible. I’m working towards creating video tutorials once I get over my video camera phobia!

If you do create your own wrap skirt please use the #marshastyle or tag me @tareemarsh so I can check out your makes  Goodluck, and I am always here to answer any questions you may have about creating this pattern.

 

The Dawn Jean – My First Attempt

The Dawn Jean
Styled with my button front cami

I’m starting this out by saying I was completely under prepared about how much top stitching thread is required to sew a pair of jeans. I naively purchased 1 x 30m real of top stitching thread and ultimately needed two and a bit. The Dawn Jeans by Megan Nielson were my first attempt of sewing jeans and it was a very rewarding process.

The Dawn Jean

I have always avoided sewing jeans as I love jeans with distressing and interesting washes. This is virtually impossible to achieve with home made jeans. Denim by the meter tends to be unwashed and a bit flat. In saying that, I am warming to this type of denim look with less distressing. I also like the idea of working on a denim fit that is perfect for my body. It is getting increasingly more difficult to find a good fitting pair of jeans in a clothing market that is saturated with denim. The irony of it……

The Dawn Jean

Megan Nielsen does a fantastic job of providing patterns that are well notched and detailed instructions on how to sew your jeans. There are also many detailed sew alongs to accompany The Dawn Jeans on her website. The Dawn Jeans come with 4 options and the first fit I’m going to conquer is the cropped flair. I have a beautiful rust colour stretch cord waiting patiently in my stash to be sewn in this style once I perfect the fit.

The Dawn Jean

For my first attempt I used an 8oz stretch denim in the colour Fawn. I purchased 3mts which is enough to make 2 pairs of these jeans in size 8. I found the top stitching process very therapeutic. My only wish was to have two sewing machines set up to save time switching out threads and stitch length. You can be as creative as you like with your top stitching. I personally prefer a simplistic approach to top stitching.

The Dawn Jean
Front topstitching
The Dawn Jean
Back top stitching

Taking the lead from many other makers on Instagram I also added contrast fabric pocket lining for an extra special finishing touch.

The Dawn Jean
Contrast pocket lining

Overall the fit was pretty good. I have a flat tush and found the pant a little saggy in the seat. And from a side view the pant collapsed in under my butt instead of hanging straight from the butt.

The Dawn Jean
Back view – needs some work

The back leg is hanging down making the back hem not level. The back leg needs to be lifted up. I’m not 100% sure how I am going to correct this but I will share with you on my next blog post of this make. I have found a handy pant fit correction guide on Closest Case Pattern website.

The Dawn Jean
The adjustment required. Now I just need to figure out how to do it!

I am also going to slim the leg line down ever so slightly on my remake. I have purchased some hardware to give that store brought look to my next pair of jeans. Another great shop for jeans hardware is Citron Jeans. More updates to come once I nail the fit of this jean!

The Dawn Jean
So versatile in their styling!

The Adelia Dress As A Top

The Adelia Dress Top Hack

The first thing that popped into my mind when I saw this top on Instagram was versatile, easy to wear and I must have one, or two, or three or four in my wardrobe. I also love the aesthetics of it’s creator The Hemming who is a fellow Gold Coast maker. Wear it with jeans or linen pants, a high waisted skirt or a pair of shorts. The options are limitless.

The pattern is sold as the Adelia Dress with a little tutorial on how to shorten it into the Adelia Top on The Hemming’s website. Many of the versions I have seen of this top have been made from linen or linen blend fabrications. I decided to give it a go in a polyester crepe from The Fabric Store.

To work out the length that will best suit you and your current wardrobe, I recommend putting on the bottoms that you would like to pair with your top once it has been made. Then measure from you High Point Shoulder (top of your shoulder close to the neck) to the length you would like your top to sit on your chosen bottoms. Next add seam allowance. I made an error in judgement here and didn’t add enough seam allowance at the hem to match the sleeve hem and my hem ended up smaller than I would have liked.

It was a quick and easy make that I was able cut and sew within a couple of hours on a Saturday morning. My other error of judgement with this piece was my choice of top stitching thread. I was not able to find the perfect colour and opted for a darker thread instead of a lighter colour thread. This left a really obvious stitch line at the centre front placket. I opted to up pick and left the front with a clean finish only being held down with the buttons and button holes.

As always, I finished my garment with the one of a kind woven label from Kylie And The Machine. I love her labels and the finishing touch they bring to my home made garments.